What’s First Aid

First aid is the assistance given to any person suffering a sudden illness or injury, with care provided to preserve life, prevent the condition from worsening, and/or promote recovery. It includes initial intervention in a serious condition prior to professional medical help being available, such as performing CPR while awaiting an ambulance, as well as the complete treatment of minor conditions, such as applying a plaster to a cut. First aid is generally performed by the layperson, with many people trained in providing basic levels of first aid, and others willing to do so from acquired knowledge. Mental health first aid is an extension of the concept of first aid to cover mental health.

There are many situations which may require first aid, and many countries have legislation, regulation, or guidance which specifies a minimum level of first aid provision in certain circumstances. This can include specific training or equipment to be available in the workplace (such as an Automated External Defibrillator), the provision of specialist first aid cover at public gatherings, or mandatory first aid training within schools. First aid, however, does not necessarily require any particular equipment or prior knowledge and can involve improvisation with materials available at the time, often by untrained persons.

From Wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/First_aid

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What’s AHA

What’s AHA

American Heart Association (AHA) is a research organization in addition to providing CPR training. Its role is both to research and establishes the guidelines for CPR training around the country—guidelines followed by both online and traditional providers of CPR training—and to promote the learning of CPR through its research. The American Red Cross, like most other CPR training programs, adheres to AHA guidelines in designing its training materials. Most people who have undergone training with both organizations will tell you that there is the microscopic difference in terms of course content.

The American Heart Association offers three main classes, as follows:

  • BLS for the Healthcare Professional
  • Heartsaver AED
  • Heartsaver CPR

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What’s CPR

Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is an emergency procedure that combines chest compressions often with artificial ventilation in an effort to manually preserve intact brain function until further measures are taken to restore spontaneous blood circulation and breathing in a person who is in cardiac arrest. It is recommended in those who are unresponsive with no breathing or abnormal breathing, for example, agonal respirations.

CPR involves chest compressions for adults between 5 cm (2.0 in) and 6 cm (2.4 in) deep and at a rate of at least 100 to 120 per minute.The rescuer may also provide artificial ventilation by either exhaling air into the subject’s mouth or nose (mouth-to-mouth resuscitation) or using a device that pushes air into the subject’s lungs (mechanical ventilation). Current recommendations place emphasis on early and high-quality chest compressions over artificial ventilation; a simplified CPR method involving chest compressions only is recommended for untrained rescuers. In children, however, only doing compressions may result in worse outcomes.

From Wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cardiopulmonary_resuscitation

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